Meet the commander-in-chief of Westminster’s Republican Club

The leaders of the Republican Club started the group to see how many conservatives they could get together. “Considering Westminster, we didn't think very many, but we got a couple of people together,” said Anthony Perryman, the club’s president. Photo by Scott Salter.

The leaders of the Republican Club started the group to see how many conservatives they could get together. “Considering Westminster, we didn't think very many, but we got a couple of people together,” said Anthony Perryman, the club’s president. Photo by Scott Salter.

Conservative students at Westminster College sometimes feel outnumbered. But that doesn’t intimidate Anthony Perryman, the president of Westminster’s Republican Club and a sophomore international business major.

Sitting at 27 members, the Republican Club focuses on political discussion and the importance of voting. Perryman’s casual persona debunks the fear that political discussion has to be fierce.

“It’s been fun to see him step into this role,” said Grayson Massey, a member of the Republican Club and a sophomore international business major. “He’s very competent and had what it took to take on the mantle as president.”

Q: How did the Westminster Republican Club start?

There was about five to six of us who got together and wondered how many conservatives we could get together. Considering Westminster, we didn't think very many, but we got a couple of people together. We’re still pretty small, but we’re trying to build up.

Q: What is the mission of the Republican Club?

One of our biggest things this year is voter registration. Our demographic of 18 to 30 has the lowest voter turnout rate. We don’t go out there we don’t do what we can to change what we want. If you want something to change or someone different in office, then you need to go vote for them. If you're not going to vote, you shouldn’t be complaining about how it is run at the time. Our democracy works best when everyone is participating.

Q: What draws you to conservative values?

I like the idea of working for your lifestyle instead of being handed your lifestyle. If you allow people to keep their money, then they will naturally reinvest into people who need it because that’s what being a good person is. I don’t think people need to be told how to spend their money.

Q: Who are you voting for in this year's presidential election?

I’m a Trump guy 100 percent. At first I wasn't; I was a Marco Rubio guy. If you break it down to the basic level who Donald Trump is and who Hillary Clinton is, Hillary Clinton is corrupt. There is evidence to prove that. As for Donald Trump, I don't know if he is corrupt not, and it's worth it to me to take that risk. I like his stance on national security. I don’t think banning people is the way to go. I don't think that’s what he’s trying to convey even though that’s how it came across. I think healthy skepticism is better for national security and would make me feel safer as a person.

Q: Is there anything you would want to say to any liberal students who are curious?

For the Republican Club, anyone is welcome to join. You’re not going to get preached at or get values shoved down your throat. We may have a debate, but it’s all in good fun. We’ll offer both sides of the argument and then let you decide, but we’re there to offer a different opinion on the whole spectrum.