Forget 9-to-5: College students find alternate ways to earn extra cash

Forget 9-to-5: College students find alternate ways to earn extra cash

In their spare time, Alex Cooper runs a clothing company, Jennifer Librizzi posts YouTube videos and Trevor Villalobos plays fantasy sports. But they have one thing in common: they each hustle to earn extra cash on the side.

Side hustles — the trade people work alongside their regular job — are becoming normal among college students and millennials.

“When you receive paychecks from different sources, it allows you to take more chances in your regular career,” said Jeff Rose in an article for Forbes. “More income means more options. More options equals freedom.”

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Self-care: Just a social media trend?

Self-care: Just a social media trend?

Millennials make more commitments to personal improvement than any generation before them, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center study. For some, these personal commitments include dietary choices, workout routines, beauty regiments, life coaching, therapy, buying plants and shopping at farmers markets.

But Laura Iverson, Westminster College’s assistant director of fitness, wellness and recreation, said that while she has noticed students have the “desire” to practice self care, it isn’t necessarily a habit.

“I don’t think it's what people are doing,” she said. “I think students think it would be a nice idea to meditate and journal, but they don’t do it because they don’t have time for it. In our 20 minutes of spare time we are scrolling through social media, looking at things we should do. It’s so easy to get sucked into [it].”

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Local radio DJ turns civic engagement into a lifelong career

Local radio DJ turns civic engagement into a lifelong career

For many students at Westminster College, civic engagement and community involvement are essential parts of both their education and future career plans.

“Civic engagement is not just service,” said first-year student Lia Baez, who volunteers at the Center for Civic Engagement on campus. “Service is great, but it’s about being politically engaged — knowing the issues going around certain populations in your community. It’s about being informed and getting involved.”

For Lara Jones, the community content manager at the local radio station KRCL, that focus on giving back to the community is a major part of her job. Five nights a week, Jones runs a show called RadioActive, which highlights local activists, artists and community leaders.

The Forum caught up with Jones via email to find out how she merges community involvement with her career and to hear her advice for students who want to become more engaged. Her responses have been lightly edited for clarity and conciseness.

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Cookie dough fad hits home with Dough Co.

Cookie dough fad hits home with Dough Co.

Fads have a tendency to go around like a cold — it spreads rapidly, not everyone catches it and it doesn’t last too long.

The no-egg raw cookie dough fad hit the ground running earlier this year in New York City. Customers have waited over an hour, sometimes even as long as two, to try some of Manhattan’s Cookie Dō NYC.

The trend hit Sugar House on June 30, when a shop called Dough Co. opened its doors. Since then, it has seen a steady stream of customers, according to Carson Melrose, a cashier and server at the dessert parlor.

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Westminster Expedition students trade the classroom for a van

Westminster Expedition students trade the classroom for a van

Instead of learning in a classroom this semester, a handful of students at Westminster College have embarked on a three-month-long road trip to learn about the Western United States, the people who live there and the problems they deal with.

“We’re bringing people out into iconic places, reading about them, hearing about them, talking to people that live and work there and getting to know places in some depth while we build a community of passionate, committed, environmentally-minded learners,” said Jeff Nichols, one of the trip leaders.

On most days, the group is up at 7 a.m. to cook breakfast and prepare lunches for the road before heading into a park or town to meet with biologists, historians and other guest speakers. After their lessons, the group heads back to camp for dinner and class around the campfire, according to Maria Nappi, a senior environmental science major.

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Students say price isn’t their biggest consideration when purchasing a ski pass

Students say price isn’t their biggest consideration when purchasing a ski pass

With six acclaimed mountains less than 30 miles away from Westminster College’s campus, the big back-to-school question on many students’ minds is where to buy their ski or snowboarding pass for the upcoming season.

“I’ve spent more time these past couple of weeks trying to decide where to ski than I’ve spent getting into my classes,” said Jessica Morgan, a junior business major.

Though students ski and snowboard at several different Utah resorts, many said the most important factor they consider when buying a pass isn’t money but friends.

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Olympian reflects on overcoming brain tumor to qualify for 2015 World Cup

Olympian reflects on overcoming brain tumor to qualify for 2015 World Cup

Before Hailey Duke became a student at Westminster College, she spent almost a decade traveling the world as a member of the U.S. National Ski Team and as an independent competitor, winning multiple major international races.

However, her path to success hit a roadblock when Duke, 31, was cut from the U.S. Ski Team in 2012 because of complications associated with a brain tumor. But the junior finance major said she wasn’t ready for her career to end — so she fought her way back to the 2015 Women's Alpine World Cup and World Championships as an independent competitor.

“I knew that my career was going to be decided by me and not by other factors,” she said.

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Westminster community responds to repeal of DACA

Westminster community responds to repeal of DACA

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump ordered an end to the Obama-era program that defers deportation for undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

The decision to overturn the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which allows these young adults to work and attend colleges and universities across the country without fear of deportation, could impact members of Westminster College’s community, according to a statement from President Steve Morgan.  

“Federal DACA decisions could adversely affect nearly 800,000 dreamers, including a number of our Westminster faculty, staff and students,” he wrote in an email sent to the student body on Sept. 1. “And at Westminster, what harms one of us harms us all.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions publicly announced the move to phase out DACA on Tuesday. Trump made no public remarks on the decision but issued a statement outlining his rationale for the action.

In the statement, Trump framed DACA as an unconstitutional overreach of power from former President Barack Obama, who established the program through an executive order after similar legislation looking to protect young immigrants had failed in Congress.

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Coffee consumption reaches historic high, raises ethical concerns

Coffee consumption reaches historic high, raises ethical concerns

Coffee consumption has reached historic records and it's thanks to millennials. 

Millennials, described as ages 19 to 34, drink 44 percent of all coffee consumed globally and American millennials lead the way, according to a Bloomberg study

The study found millennials started drinking coffee at younger ages than their parents and grandparents, with the average millennial beginning around age 14. 

Gary Marquardt, a history professor and the May term coffee class professor, said while he is surprised by the data, it also makes sense. 

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The drive behind van life

The drive behind van life

Though some people frown on the idea of living out of a vehicle, members of the millennial generation at Westminster College said this versatile way of life offers them a sense of achievement and opportunity. 

Vandwelling—living out of a car, van or motorhome as a lifestyle—was popular amongst free-spirited hippies in the '60s, according to VICE News. However, it seemed to have fallen fell out of favor until recently, when the idea of mobility and freedom piqued the interest of some millennials. 

Russel Brouillard, a recent University of Washington graduate, lives in Salt Lake with his van, a few possessions and a drive for adventure. 

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Dirty Diet Coke takes over Utah

Dirty Diet Coke takes over Utah

People around the Salt Lake Valley are lining up for specialty mixed drinks at local soda shops, where popular pops are morphed into crowd favorites like "Dirty Diet Coke." 

Some think the popularity of such shops across Utah could be attributed to the state's large population of religious individuals in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

Straws in Midvale is one of the most accessible stores for Westminster College students like Avery Paul, who said she and her family frequent the shop. 

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Students share Sugar House homeless shelter site opinions

Earlier this year, Salt Lake City determined not to move forward with a site on Simpson Avenue in Sugar House that had been under consideration for a new homeless shelter. Though the conversation about homeless shelters has since moved away from Sugar House, some students said the backlash from residents when the site was under consideration point to larger societal problems in views of individuals experiencing homelessness. Read what they had to say here:

Name: Sterling Johnson
Major: Public Health
Year: Senior

“Residents of Sugarhouse seem to be pretty ignorant and stigmatizing about the homeless population. People are concerned about their kids not having a place to play or that they won’t be able to ride their bike to work, that’s unfair and ignorant and us taking advantage of vulnerable populations. Sugarhouse also has an abundance of resources and putting the shelter here provides access to those resources.”

Name: Warren Cook
Major: History and Honors
Year: Senior

“In our capitalist society we try to pretend that we don’t have homelessness, so residents of affluent communities don’t want to acknowledge that we have plenty of impoverished people living among us. I think that there are probably other confounding factors that people don’t want the shelter in Sugarhouse but I think it’s just denial, and this tendency within our system to deny that there is anything wrong with it.”

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Name: Juan Pablo Lopez
Major: Marketting
Year: Junior

“I’m pretty disappointed that Sugarhouse decided to not have a homeless shelter in the area because we have a brand new building that was built for senior citizens and I feel like this community tries to portray itself as accepting of people’s views and for them to vote to not have a homeless shelter here is very backwards to me.”

Name: Jac'lyn Bera
Major: First-Year
Year: Psychology

“Its definitely an issue that needs to be addressed because the homeless population in Utah keeps growing every year. As for location, I don’t really know enough about the issue to really have a standing beyond that it is a problem that should be addressed both in humanitarian efforts and through our political system.”

Name: Lancee Whetman
Major: Economics
Year: Senior

“I don’t know where else they would put this proposed shelter if it wasn’t in Sugarhouse. I understand that residents have complained however I think they should take into consideration this population in the planning of the shelter in Sugarhouse.”

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Name: Grace Nakamura
Major: Nursing
Year: First-Year 

“I feel like people should treat the homeless shelter like they would their own animals, they are humans too. They shouldn’t say rude things like ‘I don’t want them living next to me’, they have to go somewhere and it doesn’t really matter where they go as long as it’s safe for everybody.”

Name: Palak Jayswal
Major: English and Journalism
Year: First-Year

“The shelter has to go somewhere, and I don’t really think it matters where as long as the people are getting taken care of. If they were to stick it in any part of town, people are going to freak out, so I think as long as we can take care of those that are less fortunate it’s important and I don’t think it should really matter where it is.”

Name: Kaydee Gilson
Major: Marketing Major and Applied Computing Minor
Year: Junior

“It seems hypocritical that people truly want to help the homeless population. People will give money or food and hope that they can find a place off the streets but now there is an opportunity to actually help them have a place to go but people are opposed because it is in their own backyard. If not in Sugarhouse, where?”

Name: Jazmin May
Major: Communication
Year: Sophomore

“I think it’s stupid just for the fact that if they are trying to be as progressive as they say, and they aren’t trying to help out. I think personally, I live 5 minutes away from Gateway and a lot of homeless people live right there so I think it’s really dumb if we are trying to make that change and Sugarhouse is just not.”

Name: Jasmynn Velez
Major: Communication
Year: First-Year

“I don’t see a problem with the shelter in Sugarhouse. I get that people are worried about real estate issues but I think it would be helpful because Salt Lake is very overpopulated with homeless people.”

Name: Calen Smith
Major: Neuroscience
Year: Sophomore

“I think that in Sugarhouse, as well as everywhere in the United States, we have a sense of entitlement and while we all like to feel like we are doing parts for the homeless population, this ‘not in my backyard mentality’ is only furthering the stigma and not helping anybody.”

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Name: Cassandra Yerkes
Major: Art Administration Major and Fine Arts Minor
Year: Junior

“I didn’t realize that the shelter didn’t get approved, I thought they were actually building one and I am shocked to hear that people in the Sugarhouse community are selfish enough to not accept a homeless shelter, which would keep homeless people off the streets and would keep them ‘out of sight’ if that’s really the issue that people have with the homeless population.”

Name: Taylor Gustafson
Major: Elementary Education
Year: Junior

“I don’t think that Sugarhouse has services that cater to the homeless population.”

Name: Claire Bruce
Major: Elementary Education
Year: Senior

“I can see both sides of the argument because I agree that the homeless population needs somewhere but I think that it needs to be somewhere that they can really make something for themselves and have a place to live and have services and grow and I think that Sugarhouse isn’t that.”

International students share their recommendations for authentic restaurants

International students share their recommendations for authentic restaurants

Students from over 26 different countries call Westminster College home. Though some are here to pursue a degree and some are here on cultural exchanges, most of them agree that food is one of the most important parts of any culture—and every country has its own twist on what tastes best. 

Westminster's international students said having the opportunity to eat authentic food in Sugar House can help ease their homesickness. The Forum sat down with some of these students for local restaurant recommendations in the Salt Lake area that serve authentic cultural food from their native countries. 

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Students say American media perpetuates cold war ideologies

Students say American media perpetuates cold war ideologies

When Altynay Kosherbek was preparing to come to America as a high school exchange student from Kazakhstan, she said she was ready for endless partying and gorging on fast food.

After she arrived, Kosherbek said she not only discovered these stereotypes about American culture aren’t true but also had to battle Kazakhstan's stereotypes, which she said the U.S. media has created.

“One major [stereotype] is [the] “Borat” movie,” said Kosherbek, a sophomore business marketing major at Westminster College. “Because of [it], people think we are still riding camels and live in yurts and stuff. It's a big misrepresentation of our country.”

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Community gardens provide Westminster students and community opportunity to reduce carbon footprint

Community gardens provide Westminster students and community opportunity to reduce carbon footprint

Alongside the warm weather, community gardens have sprouted up across Salt Lake City, providing residents with the opportunity to learn about sustainable agriculture and how to reduce their carbon footprint. 

Westminster College's community garden was founded in 2007 and has since offered students with the chance to get their hands dirty during work days, which are every Thursday from 4:30 to 6 p.m. 

Ashleigh Hughes, a biology major and Westminster's garden coordinator, said she encourages everyone on campus to spend a day or two working in the garden. 

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Thousands gathered for the People's Climate march

Thousands gathered for the People's Climate march

April 29 marked President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office, which prompted thousands of people across the world to join together to promote climate protection.

Many Westminster College students attended  Salt Lake City’s People’s Climate March, which gave them the chance to take action and raise their voices over an issue they said they strongly believe in.

“I have lived here for three years, and this is the first time I took action to have my voice heard,” said Jordan Romero, a student at Westminster College. “People need to recognize climate change is happening and change from fossil fuel energy to sustainable energy options.”

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Sugar House Park plans to go forward with dredging project after animals have become sick and died

Sugar House Park plans to go forward with dredging project after animals have become sick and died

Some Sugar House residents said they won't walk their dogs in Sugar House Park anymore after numerous birds have died and dogs have become sick from the pond water.

Now, community members said they hope a $500,000 dredging project, which passed in November 2016 and is expected to move forward at the end of this year, will help improve the park's water quality.

Dredging consists of the removal of sediments and debris at the bottom of a pond or lake. It helps prevent the spread of water contaminants like avian botulism, a toxin that's harmful to people and animals when ingested.

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Water distribution issues across the state impact recreationalists and the environment

Water distribution issues across the state impact recreationalists and the environment

Experts say water distribution issues across Utah—the second-driest state in the country— can have negative impacts on wildlife populations, the environment and recreationalists.

Much of Utah's water isn't accessible to the large community of outdoor enthusiasts who are attracted to the state. Around 40 percent of Utah's fishable water is currently on private land, according to Megan Crehan, a law student at the University of Utah and a former rafting guide.

"The public should have access to rivers and streams," Crehan said. "People are attracted to Utah because of its recreation. Just because you are accessing public lands and water doesn’t mean you are causing harm."

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Music, beer and friends: Westminster community talks about the importance of nightlife

Music, beer and friends: Westminster community talks about the importance of nightlife

Sure, college is about students furthering their academic careers and gaining knowledge. But what’s a college experience without a few late nights and a little tequila?

That's what some Westminster College students think, anyway. From Sugar House Pub to Liquid Joes, the variety of bars and lounges in downtown Salt Lake City and Sugar House attract many students and alumni, who said nightlife is an important aspect of their social lives and campus experience.

“I love meeting up with college friends and having a great time,” said Logan Butzier, a 24-year-old Westminster alumni. “My favorite thing to do is dress up in '80s costumes, get a big group of friends and go have a few drinks at Liquid Joes.”

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Students "Take Back the Night" in march for Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Students "Take Back the Night" in march for Sexual Assault Awareness Month

College students and community supporters in Salt Lake City came together for a "Take Back the Night" march on April 5 to express their support for victims of sexual violence as a part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

Westminster College and University of Utah students marched from Utah's President Circle to Westminster's Converse Hall, holding signs and chanting in an effort to reclaim public spaces as safe spaces.

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