Five ways to build a healthy, nutritious lifestyle

Five ways to build a healthy, nutritious lifestyle

For many, balancing school, studying, jobs, family, social time and sleep can be hard enough — let alone trying to find time to make affordable and nutritious meals to eat in between.

Although it isn’t always easy for students to stay balanced, Westminster College’s assistant director of fitness, wellness and recreation said overall health should still be a priority.

“Your body is where you are spending your life,” said Laura Iverson-Bastiani. “It’s the real investment.”

To help break down the many facets of a healthy life, The Forum sat down with health professionals at Westminster for advice on what things students can do to live healthier.

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Some students out of treatment facilities say they came to Westminster for a healthy environment

Some students out of treatment facilities say they came to Westminster for a healthy environment

Utah is home to 47 residential and wilderness treatment programs geared to help students experiencing distress, impairment and dysfunction, according to the National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs.

The intimate, holistic community at Westminster College is the ideal place for a student who’s struggling to get their feet on the ground, said Ellen Behrens, a professor in the master’s counseling program who specializes in wilderness and residential therapy research. That’s why she said it’s no coincidence that Westminster has a number of students who previously attended treatment programs.

“There is a network of treatment centers that all talk to each other about colleges that promote the best transitions,” Behrens said. “Word has gotten out that Westminster is a good transition because of its small class sizes, intimate community and engaged culture.”

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Some Westminster community members concerned about Republican tax reform proposal impacts on higher education

Some Westminster community members concerned about Republican tax reform proposal impacts on higher education

The Republican tax reform plan in the U.S. House of Representatives has some members of Westminster College’s community concerned about the future of higher education and who can obtain a degree.

Among other things, the House’s tax plan would consider tuition waivers — which makes some students’ tuition tax free— as taxable income. That means many students could pay significantly higher taxes than they do now, which some argue could make it difficult for those from lower socio-economic backgrounds to obtain a degree.

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Westminster community members attend rally protesting proposal to shrink Utah national monuments

Westminster community members attend rally protesting proposal to shrink Utah national monuments

Several members of the Westminster College community attended a “Rally Against Trump’s Monumental Mistakes” at the Utah State Capitol Saturday to support the continued protection of Utah’s monuments.

The National Parks Conservation Association and 15 other organizations hosted the rally in response to President Donald Trump’s visit to Utah Monday and his plan to eliminate parts of Bears Ears National Monument, which was established during President Barack Obama’s administration, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

During the public review process, around 99 percent of the over 2.7 million comments offered support for the continued protection of national monuments, according to the Utah Diné Bikéyah, a non-profit, Native American grassroots organization.

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International students concerned about leaving U.S. since Trump Administration began

International students concerned about leaving U.S. since Trump Administration began

Some of Westminster College’s 121 international students said they have been negatively impacted since President Donald Trump’s administration began in January 2016.  

Because of the administration’s travel ban issued in January on refugees and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries, some international students said they’re concerned about leaving the United States — even if the ban did not directly target their home countries.

“I can’t imagine going to Italy for Christmas and not being able to come back,” said Sara D’Agostino, a junior finance major from Italy. “My education, friends, job and basically my entire life are in the U.S.”

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Could the 2026 Winter Olympics be in Utah’s future? Westminster students, faculty react to the proposal

Could the 2026 Winter Olympics be in Utah’s future? Westminster students, faculty react to the proposal

Officials in Utah and Colorado may bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics, according to five anonymous sources as reported by the Associated Press — a proposal that has garnered mixed responses from the Westminster College community.

Colin Hinton, the president of the Utah Olympic Legacy Foundation, said in an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune that it stands “ready, willing and able when the time is right for the U.S. to host a Winter Olympics.”

When Utah hosted the winter games in 2002, the state saw a large economic benefit — spending $2.1 billion directly related to the Olympics and making $4.8 billion in sales and $1.5 billion in labor income, according to a report by the Center for Public Policy & Administration at the University of Utah.

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Looking to change gears? Get pumped for Salt Lake City’s 999 ride.

Looking to change gears? Get pumped for Salt Lake City’s 999 ride.

Nearly every Thursday at 9 p.m. on the corner of 900 South and 900 East, something unusual happens: hundreds of people gather informally on their bikes for a weekly ride around Salt Lake City.

It started as an event called An Evening in the City with Naresh, where two friends decided they were going to host a ride around the city, and has since grown into the 999 Ride (SLC).

“We really didn’t have any plans, we just got people together and went riding,” said Skylar Hoellein, an original 999 rider. “The first ride was about 10 of us and we rode around the city and the route we rode is still used today called the original 999 route.”

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Students concerned about what entry price increases mean for National Parks access

Students concerned about what entry price increases mean for National Parks access

Some students at Westminster College are concerned about the increased entrance price for National Park Service (NPS) passes — which they said may make it more difficult for those from lower socioeconomic groups to enjoy the nation’s federal lands.

The entrance fees at certain national parks, including four of the five parks in Utah, had previously cost $25 or $30 to enter but will now cost $70 in an effort to address maintenance backlog, according to the NPS.

Anna Marno, a sophomore public health major who visits the parks several times a year, said she understands the need for the National Park Service to have a sustainable income to help with preservation but wishes there was a better way.

“I think it’s really important to have funds to maintain the parks,” she said. “But at the same time, I think that it’s pretty sad that the increase in price will limit accessibility to a number of potential visitors.”

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Politicians from across the aisle come together at Westminster to talk civility

Politicians from across the aisle come together at Westminster to talk civility

Some 27 percent of Democrats say Republican policies are a threat to the country’s well-being; more than a third of Republicans think the same of Democratic policies, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center survey.

Over the past two decades — and in the time since the divisive 2016 presidential election — the polarization between these political parties has grown to an all time high. A recent CBS News poll reported that 68 percent of respondents think the tone and civility in political debates in the United States is getting worse.

To combat that, Westminster College’s Honors College hosted a conversation between Josh Romney, a potential Republican candidate for Utah governor, and Democratic Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams on Nov. 2.

In front of a full audience in the Vieve Gore Concert Hall, the pair dug into how the country’s large ideological gap formed and how that might change.

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Students in Salt Lake’s EDM community say it isn’t what it looks like

Students in Salt Lake’s EDM community say it isn’t what it looks like

Electronic dance music (EDM) has been around since the 1980s but has become increasingly popular in the last 15 years, with a strong community in Salt Lake City.

Though some still wonder about the appeal of EDM, some current and former students at Westminster College said it’s the experience at live shows and community feel that draws them into the genre.

“I think EDM has kind of turned into this really broad umbrella term,” said Matt Lancaster, who graduated from Westminster last year. “There’s over 100 different subgenres of electronic music, and for people who don’t know much about it they kind of just group everything under that umbrella and then it’s all just the same.”

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Forget 9-to-5: College students find alternate ways to earn extra cash

Forget 9-to-5: College students find alternate ways to earn extra cash

In their spare time, Alex Cooper runs a clothing company, Jennifer Librizzi posts YouTube videos and Trevor Villalobos plays fantasy sports. But they have one thing in common: they each hustle to earn extra cash on the side.

Side hustles — the trade people work alongside their regular job — are becoming normal among college students and millennials.

“When you receive paychecks from different sources, it allows you to take more chances in your regular career,” said Jeff Rose in an article for Forbes. “More income means more options. More options equals freedom.”

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Self-care: Just a social media trend?

Self-care: Just a social media trend?

Millennials make more commitments to personal improvement than any generation before them, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center study. For some, these personal commitments include dietary choices, workout routines, beauty regiments, life coaching, therapy, buying plants and shopping at farmers markets.

But Laura Iverson, Westminster College’s assistant director of fitness, wellness and recreation, said that while she has noticed students have the “desire” to practice self care, it isn’t necessarily a habit.

“I don’t think it's what people are doing,” she said. “I think students think it would be a nice idea to meditate and journal, but they don’t do it because they don’t have time for it. In our 20 minutes of spare time we are scrolling through social media, looking at things we should do. It’s so easy to get sucked into [it].”

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Local radio DJ turns civic engagement into a lifelong career

Local radio DJ turns civic engagement into a lifelong career

For many students at Westminster College, civic engagement and community involvement are essential parts of both their education and future career plans.

“Civic engagement is not just service,” said first-year student Lia Baez, who volunteers at the Center for Civic Engagement on campus. “Service is great, but it’s about being politically engaged — knowing the issues going around certain populations in your community. It’s about being informed and getting involved.”

For Lara Jones, the community content manager at the local radio station KRCL, that focus on giving back to the community is a major part of her job. Five nights a week, Jones runs a show called RadioActive, which highlights local activists, artists and community leaders.

The Forum caught up with Jones via email to find out how she merges community involvement with her career and to hear her advice for students who want to become more engaged. Her responses have been lightly edited for clarity and conciseness.

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Cookie dough fad hits home with Dough Co.

Cookie dough fad hits home with Dough Co.

Fads have a tendency to go around like a cold — it spreads rapidly, not everyone catches it and it doesn’t last too long.

The no-egg raw cookie dough fad hit the ground running earlier this year in New York City. Customers have waited over an hour, sometimes even as long as two, to try some of Manhattan’s Cookie Dō NYC.

The trend hit Sugar House on June 30, when a shop called Dough Co. opened its doors. Since then, it has seen a steady stream of customers, according to Carson Melrose, a cashier and server at the dessert parlor.

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Westminster Expedition students trade the classroom for a van

Westminster Expedition students trade the classroom for a van

Instead of learning in a classroom this semester, a handful of students at Westminster College have embarked on a three-month-long road trip to learn about the Western United States, the people who live there and the problems they deal with.

“We’re bringing people out into iconic places, reading about them, hearing about them, talking to people that live and work there and getting to know places in some depth while we build a community of passionate, committed, environmentally-minded learners,” said Jeff Nichols, one of the trip leaders.

On most days, the group is up at 7 a.m. to cook breakfast and prepare lunches for the road before heading into a park or town to meet with biologists, historians and other guest speakers. After their lessons, the group heads back to camp for dinner and class around the campfire, according to Maria Nappi, a senior environmental science major.

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Students say price isn’t their biggest consideration when purchasing a ski pass

Students say price isn’t their biggest consideration when purchasing a ski pass

With six acclaimed mountains less than 30 miles away from Westminster College’s campus, the big back-to-school question on many students’ minds is where to buy their ski or snowboarding pass for the upcoming season.

“I’ve spent more time these past couple of weeks trying to decide where to ski than I’ve spent getting into my classes,” said Jessica Morgan, a junior business major.

Though students ski and snowboard at several different Utah resorts, many said the most important factor they consider when buying a pass isn’t money but friends.

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Olympian reflects on overcoming brain tumor to qualify for 2015 World Cup

Olympian reflects on overcoming brain tumor to qualify for 2015 World Cup

Before Hailey Duke became a student at Westminster College, she spent almost a decade traveling the world as a member of the U.S. National Ski Team and as an independent competitor, winning multiple major international races.

However, her path to success hit a roadblock when Duke, 31, was cut from the U.S. Ski Team in 2012 because of complications associated with a brain tumor. But the junior finance major said she wasn’t ready for her career to end — so she fought her way back to the 2015 Women's Alpine World Cup and World Championships as an independent competitor.

“I knew that my career was going to be decided by me and not by other factors,” she said.

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Westminster community responds to repeal of DACA

Westminster community responds to repeal of DACA

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump ordered an end to the Obama-era program that defers deportation for undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

The decision to overturn the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which allows these young adults to work and attend colleges and universities across the country without fear of deportation, could impact members of Westminster College’s community, according to a statement from President Steve Morgan.  

“Federal DACA decisions could adversely affect nearly 800,000 dreamers, including a number of our Westminster faculty, staff and students,” he wrote in an email sent to the student body on Sept. 1. “And at Westminster, what harms one of us harms us all.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions publicly announced the move to phase out DACA on Tuesday. Trump made no public remarks on the decision but issued a statement outlining his rationale for the action.

In the statement, Trump framed DACA as an unconstitutional overreach of power from former President Barack Obama, who established the program through an executive order after similar legislation looking to protect young immigrants had failed in Congress.

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Coffee consumption reaches historic high, raises ethical concerns

Coffee consumption reaches historic high, raises ethical concerns

Coffee consumption has reached historic records and it's thanks to millennials. 

Millennials, described as ages 19 to 34, drink 44 percent of all coffee consumed globally and American millennials lead the way, according to a Bloomberg study

The study found millennials started drinking coffee at younger ages than their parents and grandparents, with the average millennial beginning around age 14. 

Gary Marquardt, a history professor and the May term coffee class professor, said while he is surprised by the data, it also makes sense. 

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The drive behind van life

The drive behind van life

Though some people frown on the idea of living out of a vehicle, members of the millennial generation at Westminster College said this versatile way of life offers them a sense of achievement and opportunity. 

Vandwelling—living out of a car, van or motorhome as a lifestyle—was popular amongst free-spirited hippies in the '60s, according to VICE News. However, it seemed to have fallen fell out of favor until recently, when the idea of mobility and freedom piqued the interest of some millennials. 

Russel Brouillard, a recent University of Washington graduate, lives in Salt Lake with his van, a few possessions and a drive for adventure. 

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