The Orange Effect takes over Salt Lake City

Photo courtesy Orangetheory Fitness Salt Lake. Members of the Salt Lake Orangetheory get in a good workout. Instructors have participants rotate between treadmills, water rowers and the weight floor during the one-hour session, all while helping with correct form and maintaining motivation.

Photo courtesy Orangetheory Fitness Salt Lake. Members of the Salt Lake Orangetheory get in a good workout. Instructors have participants rotate between treadmills, water rowers and the weight floor during the one-hour session, all while helping with correct form and maintaining motivation.

Salt Lake City residents are burning calories and seeing orange while they do. As its one-year anniversary approaches, Orangetheory Fitness continues to attract people from all fitness levels who are determined to meet their fitness goals and experience the Orange Effect.

Located along 600 East in Trolley Square, Orangetheory Fitness is a cardio-based workout.

“It’s really focused on the individual's heart rate,” said Holly Marsh, member consultant. “Everyone is going to have a different (heart rate zone) based on anatomy, based on fitness level, etc. It’s really tailored to the individual, which is a big thing that Orangetheory promotes.”

There is an actual science behind the workouts and concept of Orangetheory.

“The physiological theory behind the Orangetheory workout is known as Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption, or EPOC,” according to its website. “By providing you with a heart-rate monitor and POD, we can monitor your five-zone interval training sessions that we call the Orange 60.”

Some highlights of the 60-minute workout include performing multiple intervals designed to produce 12–20 minutes of training at people’s maximum heart rates, producing the workout "afterburn" effect and increased metabolic rates so the participant can continue to burn calories for up to 36 hours after the workout.

Orangetheory Fitness can be an option for students looking to get a good workout in between work, classes and busy schedules.

“It’s really convenient,” said Marsh, member consultant. “It’s a really good way to know what you’re doing without really thinking about it. You walk in here and there’s already a template made for you. You’ve got people who are on the same journey and who have the same goals as you and who are pushing you. I think that’s the biggest thing that separates [Orangetheory] is that this is a holistic approach to working out, and it’s kind of revolutionized the idea of working out.”

Marsh said she thinks Orangetheory attracts Millennials because of a combination of the set up, the overall look of the fitness center and its app.

“There is no complication to it,” Marsh said. “You take out your phone, you sign up on the app, you cancel on the app. Even if you’re not tech savvy and you want someone else to do it, we’ll book your classes for you.”

Orangetheory offers a free trial class, and those interested can visit its website and connect on social media for all the latest information.